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JACOB HAY
The Bomb in the Attic


click to enlarge

Pan, London, 1964
(price: 3/6; 208 pages)
first published in Britain by Arthur Barker in 1962


The blurb on the back:

Glossy photographs, colour slides, films, books - the hottest collection of pornography north of Mexico. All of it was ticking away in the attic of young Freddie Lazenby ... ticking with the deadliness of a time bomb - for Freddie was on a Presidential Committee investigating the corruption of youth! And to add temptation to torment many of the glossy photographs revealed his prim, proper secretary in the most improper poses!
'It is hideously funny. Jacob Hay is one of the few writers nowadays who realise that sex is hilarious … I laughed aloud - to the great consternation of my fellow passengers - and this has not happened since I read
Lucky Jim’ - Keith Waterhouse, co-author of Billy Liar
'The book that gave me most undisguised pleasure this week' -
New Statesman


opening lines:
It was Dr Chernowith who suggested this.


It comes on like a would-be screwball comedy set amongst hip young hacks in Washington, DC, and it’s ultimately as tiresome as all these things are. As I’m sure I’ve noted many times in these pages, wacky comedy dates really badly. If the writing’s good enough, things can survive even when they’re no longer daring and shocking, as the likes of Evelyn Waugh (and indeed, the boy Auberon) demonstrate.

But this ain’t really good enough. The jokes aren’t good enough, and the characters aren’t strong enough, and the whole effect is much like an American sitcom of the era. Still, if you like that kind of thing…


ARTISTIC MERIT: 2/5
ENTERTAINMENT VALUE:
2/5
HIPNESS QUOTIENT:
2/5


like this? try this:
more wackiness
Robert Gover, The One Dollar Misunderstanding
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