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JOEL LIEBER
Move!


click to enlarge

Sphere, London, 1971
(price: 5/- (25p); 160 pages)

dedication: to Sylvie


The blurb on the back:

When is adultery no adultery?
Lovely, luscious longsuffering Dolly wanted a houseful of children. But Hiram, playwright and dogwalker, didn't even want Dolly, let alone children. Which was surprising because Hiram did spend five hours - yes, five hours - making love to a certain blond lady he met while walking the dog.
Things really started going wrong when Hiram took a new apartment. A big place with lots of room for the children he didn't want. Why did the Removal man never show up? And make all those insulting telephone calls about Hiram's private life?
Was he Dolly's lover?

'Lieber is a young writer of enormous talent.' - Saturday Review


opening lines:
An eruption of hoofbeats shattered the quiet of the late afternoon.


In 1970 Elliott Gould was a big star. He was coming off a sequence of three critical and commercial movie hits, Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice, M*A*S*H and Gettng Straight, when he took on the lead role in an adaptation of this book. Oddly - and I have no explanation for this - it bombed entirely and disappeared almost without trace: it doesn't, for example, exist at all as far as the Radio Times Guide To Films.

I haven't seen the film, but the book would suggest that it should work okay: a neurotic Jewish dramatist with writer's block living in New York, having problems with his sex-life. It's all standard stuff, really, typical would-be wacky stuff from the period. Nothing special, and not unrelated to the likes of Robert Klane. The film, on the other hand, might be better. After all it has Elliott Gould in it.


ARTISTIC MERIT: 2/5
ENTERTAINMENT VALUE:
2/5
HIPNESS QUOTIENT:
2/5


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